The Golden Retriever is a medium-large gun dog that was bred to retrieve shot waterfowl, such as ducks and upland game birds, during hunting and shooting parties. The name “retriever” refers to the breed’s ability to retrieve shot game undamaged due to their soft mouth.

Golden retrievers have an instinctive love of water, and are easy to train to basic or advanced obedience standards. They are a long-coated breed, with a dense inner coat that provides them with adequate warmth in the outdoors, and an outer coat that lies flat against their bodies and repels water.

Golden retrievers are well suited to residency in suburban or country environments.They shed copiously, particularly at the change of seasons, and require fairly regular grooming. The Golden Retriever was originally bred in Scotland in the mid-19th century.

The breed is a prominent participant in conformation shows for purebred dogs. The Golden Retriever is popular as a disability assistance dog, such as being a guide dog for the blind and a hearing dog for the deaf. In addition, they are trained to be a hunting dog, a detection dog, and a search and rescue participant.

The breed’s friendly, gentle temperament means it is unsuited to being a professional guard dog, but its temperament has also made it the third-most popular family dog breed (by registration) in the United States the fifth-most popular in Braziland Australia,and the eighth-most popular in the United Kingdom.

Golden Retrievers are rarely choosy eaters, but require ample (two or more hours a day) exercise.The breed is fond of play but also highly trainable.

Overview

Origin

Scotland, United Kingdom

Price

The Golden Retriever price varies greatly, perhaps more than any other breed. On average, you can expect to pay between $500-$2,000.


At the lower end of the price spectrum may be dogs from a pet store or home breeder without AKC documentation.


Dogs with excellent bloodlines and/or special characteristics like a smaller size will cost more, around the $1,000-$2,000 range. While this cost is more upfront, keep in mind that the pedigree of these pups may mean less health issues – and fewer vet bills – down the road.


And if a dog has champion bloodlines, that will cost even more.

Of course, you can always adopt a Golden Retriever for much less. Pet adoption usually ranges from $350-$550 and includes registrations and vaccinations. You’re providing a home for a dog in need and saving money in the process, so it’s certainly a win-win.

Traits

Breed Group

Sporting

Weight

Male 65–75 lb (29–34 kg)

Female 55–65 lb (25–29 kg)

Height

Male 22–24 in (56–61 cm)

Female 20–22 in (51–56 cm)

Coat

straight or moderately wavy

Colour any shades of gold or cream

Life span average 10–12 years

Personality

Intelligent, friendly, and devoted.


Energy Level

Very Active; This dog is active and energetic, and needs daily exercise.


Good with Children

Yes


Good with other Dogs

Yes


Shedding

 

Seasonal


Grooming

 

Occasional


Trainability

 

Eager To Please


Barking Level

Barks When Necessary

Name

English Name Golden Retriever

Spanish name

Perro Perdiguero De Oro

Arabic name

المسترد الذهبي

Russian name

Золотистый ретривер

Japanese name

ゴールデン・レトリバー

Korean name

골든 리트리버

Characteristics

The Golden Retriever is a medium-large, strongly built breed with a dense, water-repellant wavy coat.As a dog with origins in pedigree breeding, and owing to its widespread historical popularity, some regional variations have emerged in the breed; therefore, the three subtypes of the Golden Retriever reflect the typical variations in dimensions and coat. However, all Golden Retrievers are blonde, yellow, or gold in colour, and all subtypes are susceptible to the same health problems.

Coat and colour

As indicated by their name, their coats occur in light golden to dark golden colours. The topcoat is water-resistant and slightly wavy, and sheds in small amounts throughout the year. The undercoat is soft and keeps the retriever cool in summer and warm in winter; it sheds in the spring and fall.It usually lies flat against the belly.

The Golden’s coat should never be too long, as this may prove to be a disservice to it in the field, especially when retrieving game. Golden Retrievers have mild feathering on the backs of their fore legs and heavier feathering on the fronts of their necks, backs of their thighs and the bottoms of their tails.

The American Kennel Club (AKC) standard states the coat is a “rich, lustrous golden of various shades”, disallowing extremely light or extremely dark coats.This leaves the outer ranges of coat colour up to a judge’s discretion when competing in conformation shows. Therefore, “pure white” and “red” are unacceptable, as is black.

The Kennel Club (UK) also permits cream as an acceptable coat colour. Judges may also disallow Goldens with pink noses, or those lacking pigment. The Golden’s coat can also be mahogany, referred to as “redhead”, although this is not accepted in the British show ring.

As a Golden grows older, its coat can become darker or lighter, along with a noticeable whitening of the fur on and around the muzzle. Puppy coats are usually much lighter than their adult coats, but a puppy with darker ear tips may indicate a darker adult colour.

Care

nutrition

A high-quality dog food appropriate for the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior) will have all the nutrients the breed needs. Some Goldens can become overweight, so watch your dog’s calorie consumption and weight level. If you choose to give your dog treats, do so in moderation.

 

Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Give table scraps sparingly, if at all, especially avoiding cooked bones and foods with high fat content. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet.

 

Health and lifespan

The average lifespan for a Golden Retriever is about 11 to 12 years.The breed is susceptible to specific ailments, so pets should be taken to a veterinarian for yearly checkups.


Golden Retrievers are known to have genetic disorders and other diseases. Hip dysplasia is common in the breed; when buying a puppy, the pedigree should be known and be examined by the OFA or by PennHIP for hip disease.

 

Obesity is also common in the breed because Golden Retrievers love to eat. Puppies should eat about three cups of food a day and adults three to five cups, depending on the food and how active the dog is.

 

Common health problems

Cancer is the breed’s biggest killer, causing 61.4% of American Golden deaths according to a 1998 health study conducted by the Golden Retriever Club of America. The most common is hemangiosarcoma, followed by lymphosarcoma, mast cell tumour, and osteosarcoma.A 2004 survey by the UK Kennel Club puts this number at 38.8%.

Although most puppies are screened for the disorders before being sold (by reputable breeders), hip and elbow dysplasia afflict one-fifth of dogs.Eye diseases are also possible in the breed; cataracts are the most common eye disease, but they can also be afflicted with progressive retinal atrophy, glaucoma, distichiasis, entropion, corneal dystrophy,and retinal dysplasia.


They may suffer from heart disease, especially subvalvular aortic stenosis, and cardiomyopathy and joint diseases, including patella luxation, osteochondritis, panosteitis, and cruciate ligament rupture.

Their long hair also gets knotted up under the ears and longer hairs on their belly and legs if not groomed, these dreads can be cut out with scissors with slow rapid cuts. They can cause pain and discomfort and if left too long will get more matted. In addition to the heavy shedding they experience (and their constant lighter shedding throughout the year),

Golden Retrievers can suffer from skin diseases; the most prevalent skin problem is allergies (often leading to acute moist dermatitis or “hot spots”), with the most common allergy being to fleas. They can also suffer from seborrhoea, sebaceous adenitis, self-inflicted lick granuloma, and haemophilia.

Grooming


Golden Retrievers require regular grooming and occasional baths.Their coats shed somewhat during the year, but are known to shed profusely twice a year.

 

They also need to have their ears cleaned regularly, or ear infections might occur. While shedding is unavoidable, frequent grooming (daily to weekly) lessens the amount of hair shed by the animal. Severe shedding resulting in bald patches can be indicative of stress or sickness.

Exercise

Like most Sporting breeds, Goldens need plenty of daily exercise. A Golden who doesn’t get enough exercise is likely to engage in undesirable behavior.

 

Goldens make great companions on long runs and bike rides, although consultation with a vet is recommended before starting strenuous or high-impact activities that might cause stress to the dog’s bones and joints.

 

Many Goldens happily get their exercise on hunting trips or at field trials, as well as by participating in canine sports such as agility, obedience, and tracking.

 

training 

As with all breeds, early socialization and puppy training classes are recommended. Gently exposing the puppy to a wide variety of people, places, and situations between the ages of seven weeks and four months will help the Golden develop into a well-adjusted, well-mannered adult.

 

Puppy training classes serve as part of the socialization process and help the owner learn to recognize and correct any bad habits that may be developing.

 

Obedience training strengthens the bond between dog and owner—a Golden wants nothing more than to please his human. Golden Retrievers are outgoing, loyal, and eager to do your bidding, which makes them very easy to train.

 

Feeding


Recommended daily amount: 2 to 3 cups of high-quality dry food a day, divided into two meals.

 


NOTE: How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don’t all need the same amount of food. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference — the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you’ll need to shake into your dog’s bowl.

 

Keep your Golden in good shape by measuring his food and feeding him twice a day rather than leaving food out all the time. If you’re unsure whether he’s overweight, give him the eye test and the hands-on test.

 

First, look down at him. You should be able to see a waist. Then place your hands on his back, thumbs along the spine, with the fingers spread downward. You should be able to feel but not see his ribs without having to press hard. If you can’t, he needs less food and more exercise.

 

You’ll need to take special care if you’re raising a Golden puppy. These dogs grow very rapidly between the age of four and seven months, making them susceptible to bone disorders. They do well on a high-quality, low-calorie diet that keeps them from growing too fast.

 

For more on feeding your Golden, see our guidelines for buying the right food, feeding your puppy, and feeding your adult dog.

 

Children And Other Pets

The amiable Golden Retriever isn’t bothered by the noise and commotion of kids — in fact, he thrives on it. He’s a large, strong dog, though, and he can easily knock over a small child by mistake.

 


As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he’s eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog’s food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

 


The Golden’s attitude toward other pets is the more the merrier. He enjoys the companionship of other dogs, and with proper introductions and training, can be trusted with cats, rabbits, and other animals.

 

Golden Retriever Temperament and Personality

Ask anyone about the defining characteristic of the Golden Retriever, and the answer you will always get is temperament. The hallmark of the Golden is his kind, gentle, eager-to-please nature. He craves affection and will seek it from strangers as well as his own family.

 


Goldens are adaptable and people-oriented, and those characteristics are at the top of the list of reasons people love them. Unfortunately, the breed’s popularity has meant that careless or clueless people have begun churning out Goldens without any attempt to maintain their sweet, gentle disposition. Shyness and aggression can be problems, leading to fear biting or unfriendliness toward people and other dogs.

 


Proper Goldens love everyone, but that love for people will often translate into jumping as a form of greeting. Basic, early obedience training is a must for these big, rambunctious dogs. Fortunately, Goldens are very easy to train, and a small investment of time when the dog is young will pay off when he’s full-grown. He will readily sit on command, walk on a leash without pulling and come when called.

 


If not trained, socialized and exercised daily, the good-natured exuberance of Goldens – especially as adolescents and young adults – can be overwhelming, and even frightening to small children, despite the dog’s best intentions to be friendly. Choose a Golden as a family dog only if you are prepared to supervise kids and dog when they are together and make sure everyone plays nicely. It’s normal for puppies to chase and bite in play, so you need to teach a Golden pup how to act around kids, as well as teach the kids how to play properly with the dog.

 


Any dog, even a Golden, can develop obnoxious levels of barking, digging, food stealing and other undesirable behaviors if he is bored, untrained or unsupervised. And any dog can be a trial to live with during adolescence. In the case of the Golden, the “teen” years can start at six months and continue until the dog is two or three years old. Start training early, be patient and be consistent, and one day you will wake up to find that you live with a great dog.

 


The perfect Golden Retriever is a product of his environment and breeding. Whether you want a Golden as a companion, show dog, canine competition dog or all three in one, look for one whose parents have nice personalities and who has been well socialized from early puppyhood.

 

Origins and history

The Golden Retriever was originally bred in Scotland in the mid-19th century.At that time, wildfowl hunting was a popular sport for the wealthy Scottish elite, but the existing retriever breeds were inadequate for retrieving downed game from both water and land.

 

Retrieving from both land and water was necessary because the hunting grounds of the time were pocketed with marshy ponds and rivers. Consequently, the best water spaniels were crossed with the existing retrievers, resulting in the establishment of the breed today known as the Golden Retriever.

 

The Golden Retriever was first developed near Glen Affric in Scotland, at “Guisachan”, the highland estate of Dudley Marjoribanks, 1st Baron Tweedmouth. The breed is thought to have originated from the now-extinct Russian tracker dog.
Improvements in guns during the 1800s resulted in more fowl being downed during hunts at greater distances and over increasingly difficult terrain, leading to more birds being lost in the field.

 

Because of this improvement in firearms, a need for a specialist retriever arose, as training setter and pointer breeds in retrievals was found to be ineffective. Thus, work began on the breeding of the dog to fill this much-needed role.
The original cross was of a yellow-coloured retriever, ‘Nous’, with a Tweed Water Spaniel female dog, ‘Belle’.

 

The Tweed Water Spaniel is now extinct, but was then common in the border country. Marjoribanks had purchased Nous in 1865 from an unregistered litter of otherwise black wavy-coated retriever pups.

 

In 1868, this cross produced a litter that included four pups; these four became the basis of a breeding program which included the Irish Setter, the sandy-coloured Bloodhound, the St. John’s water dog of Newfoundland, and two more wavy-coated black retrievers.

 

The bloodline was also inbred and selected for trueness to Marjoribanks’ idea of the ultimate hunting dog. His vision included a more vigorous and powerful dog than previous retrievers, one that would still be gentle and trainable. Russian sheepdogs are not mentioned in these records, nor are any other working dog breeds.

 

The ancestry of the Golden Retriever is all sporting dogs, in line with Marjoribanks’ goals. The Golden Retriever was active and powerful and had a gentle mouth for retrieving games while on hunts.

 


In the United Kingdom


A Golden retriever puppy at play
Golden Retrievers were first accepted for registration by The Kennel Club in 1903, as Flat Coats – Golden. They were first exhibited in 1908, and in 1911 were recognized as a breed referred to as Retriever (Golden and Yellow).

 


In Scotland


In July 2006, the Golden Retriever Club of Scotland organized a gathering of Golden Retriever enthusiasts at the ancestral home, Guisachan House. A photograph taken by photographer Lynn Kipps to commemorate the occasion captured 188 Golden Retrievers, and so holds the record for the most Golden Retrievers in one image.


In the United States


It took another 14 years for the breed to be recognized in America, and in 1925, the American Kennel Club did so. In 1938, the Golden Retriever Club of America was founded. Golden Retrievers are ranked number two for American Kennel Club Registrations.

As of the year 1999, 62,652 have been registered and the only breed above them is the Labrador Retriever.According to the purebred dog guide recognized by the American Kennel Club, Golden Retrievers are judged based on a variety of traits: colour, coat, ears, feet, nose, body, etc.


In Canada


The Honourable Archie Marjoribanks took a Golden Retriever to Canada in 1881, and registered “Lady” with the AKC in 1894. These are the first records of the breed in these two countries. The breed was first registered in Canada in 1927, and the Golden Retriever Club of Ontario (GRCO) was formed in 1958.

 

The cofounders of the GRCO were Cliff Drysdale, an Englishman who had brought over an English Golden, and Jutta Baker, daughter-in-law of Louis Baker, who owned Northland Kennels. The GCRO in later years expanded to become the Golden Retriever Club of Canada.

 

The Breed Standard

General Appearance

A symmetrical, powerful, active dog, sound and well put together, not clumsy nor long in the leg, displaying a kindly expression and possessing a personality that is eager, alert and self-confident. Primarily a hunting dog, he should be shown in hard working condition.

 

Overall appearance, balance, gait and purpose to be given more emphasis than any of his component parts. Faults-Any departure from the described ideal shall be considered faulty to the degree to which it interferes with the breed’s purpose or is contrary to breed character.

 

Head

Broad in skull, slightly arched laterally and longitudinally without prominence of frontal bones (forehead) or occipital bones. Stop well defined but not abrupt. Foreface deep and wide, nearly as long as skull. Muzzle straight in profile, blending smooth and strongly into skull; when viewed in profile or from above, slightly deeper and wider at stop than at tip. No heaviness in flews.

 

Removal of whiskers is permitted but not preferred. Eyes friendly and intelligent in expression, medium large with dark, close-fitting rims, set well apart and reasonably deep in sockets. Color preferably dark brown; medium brown acceptable.

 

Body

Neck medium long, merging gradually into shoulders, sturdy and muscular. Back strong and level from withers to slightly sloping croup. Body is well-balanced, short coupled, with deep chest and well-developed forechest. Ribs long and wellsprung but not barrel shaped. Loin short, muscular, wide and deep.

 

Forequarters

Muscular, well co-ordinated and capable of free movement. Shoulder blades long and well laid back with upper tips fairly close together.

 

Elbows close to the ribs without looseness. Legs straight, with good bone but not coarse.
Pasterns short and strong, sloping slightly. Dewclaws on forelegs are normally left on. Feet- medium size, round and compact with thick pads.

 

Coat

Dense and water-repellent with good undercoat. Outer coat firm and resilient, lying close to body,may be straight or wavy. Untrimmed natural ruff on neck, moderate feathering on back of forelegs and on underbody; heavier feathering on front of neck, back of thighs and underside of tail.

 

Coat on head, paws, and front of legs is short and even. Color– rich, lustrous golden of various shades. Feathering may be lighter than rest of coat.

 

Hindquarters

Broad and strongly muscled. Croup slopes only slightly. Stifles well angulated. Good length of thighs, short, strong rear pasterns.. Feet as in front.

Tail– thick and muscular at the base, following the natural line of the croup. Tail
bones extend to the point of the hock. Carried level in action, or with slight upward curve; never curled over back.

 

Fun Facts:

The Golden Retriever is the go-to disability assistance dog, especially for leading the blind or the deaf. They’re naturally good workers, so they also find employment in drug detection, bomb detection, wheelchair assistance, therapy, and search-and-rescue efforts.

 


Golden Retrievers were bred for retrieving shot waterfowl during hunting parties, and as such their mouths are incredibly gentle. this adds to the perception that they are great family dogs.

 

 

Questions

1.Where are golden retriever dogs from?

The Golden Retriever was originally bred in Scotland in the mid-19th century. At that time, wildfowl hunting was a popular sport for the wealthy Scottish elite, but the existing retriever breeds were inadequate for retrieving downed game from both water and land.

 

2.When golden retriever first heat?

Golden retrievers are more likely to have their first heat cycle at about 10 to 14 months; with giant breeds starting at 18 to 24 months. Keep in mind, these are ranges and it could be earlier or later as every dog is different.

 

3.When is golden retriever day?

Saturday, October 10, 2020

 

4.When do golden retriever shed?

Golden Retrievers shed moderately in the winter and summer, and heavily in the spring and fall. If you live with a Golden, you’ll need to adapt to a certain amount of dog hair in your house and on your clothes. The Golden’s thick coat means lots of grooming.

 

5.When to feed golden retriever puppy?

Start feeding twice a day when he’s about 11 or 12 weeks old. Meal size will vary with each pup, but the average Golden puppy at 7 weeks is polishing off about 1/3 to 1/2 cup of dry food at each meal. Feed it dry with water available on the side.

 

6.How often should a Golden Retriever be groomed?

6 weeks
Golden Retrievers are a very active breed. A bath and a blowout are necessary to keep the shedding under control and maintain healthy skin and coat. Regular grooming should be done every 4 – 6 weeks.

 

7.Do Golden Retrievers require a lot of grooming?

Golden Retriever’s do require basic grooming. Goldens are a double coated breed. … Regular brushing with a quality bristle brush along with regular use of an undercoat rake will significantly reduce shedding, which will make you and your Golden very happy. Golden Retriever’s require regular bathing.

 

8.How much does it cost to groom a golden retriever?


From baths to brushing, to even painting your dog’s nails, you can expect to pay $40 for grooming a small dog and $75 to groom a large dog.

 

9.Why golden retrievers are the best dogs?

Golden retrievers are big dogs, and they’re certainly full of energy, but they also tend to be extremely gentle. These dogs are one of the few breeds to historically have been selectively bred for temperament over looks, and many breed standards include the fact that goldens should have a sweet and gentle temperament.

 

10.Will golden retriever protect you?

Golden Retrievers can make excellent guard dogs. They are large, protective and smart enough to guard your home and your family with minimal training at times. This is largely due to their obedient and loyal nature.

 

11.Will golden retriever bite?

Yes, Golden Retrievers are known for their good-natured demeanor, but they are still dogs. To start with, all dogs have the chance to bite. When it comes to Goldens, it seems that they have a stronger tendency to nip, especially when they’re very young. Yes, we can all agree that a Golden Retriever puppy gently biting on your fingers is the cutest thing in the world.

 

Biting at this young age is healthy to all pups because it strengthens and improves gums and tooth health. However, encouraging this type of behavior at a very early age can also lead to aggression and dominance issues in later years, and that’s why puppies should be taught to stop biting when they are still very young.
Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/behavior/why-do-golden-retrievers-bite-so-much

 

11.Can golden retriever be left alone?

Yes. Golden Retrievers actually do fine left alone if you take the proper precautions. For example, your dog will need a bathroom break every 3 to 5 hours. Also, your dog should have access to water throughout the day even if they are inside.

 

12.Are golden retriever puppies stubborn?


They Are Stubborn
Golden Retrievers are extremely intelligent, which makes them easy to train, but they also have a mind of their own. If a golden doesn’t want to do something, you can expect him to put up a fight.

 

13.What golden retriever can eat?

Carrots、Peanut Butter、Eggs、Salmon、Blueberries、Popcorn、Pineapple、Watermelon、Bread、Blackberries、Corn、Green Peas、Oatmeal、Apples、Broccoli、Chicken、Sweet Potatoes、Coconut、Pork、Mango、Turkey、Rice、Beef、Bananas、Strawberries、Oranges、Mushrooms、Potatoes、Celery、Shrimp。

 

14.Golden retriever can be a guard dog?

Golden Retrievers can make excellent guard dogs. They are large, protective and smart enough to guard your home and your family with minimal training at times. This is largely due to their obedient and loyal nature.

 

15.Golden retriever litter size?

The average litter size for a golden retriever is eight puppies. Litter sizes vary from four to 12 puppies, and humans are not usually needed for help in the birthing process.

 

 

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Summary
Golden Retriever Dog Breed Informatio,Price,Profile,Questions,Pictures,Temperament,Characteristics Care Info,and Facts -Petckc
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Golden Retriever Dog Breed Informatio,Price,Profile,Questions,Pictures,Temperament,Characteristics Care Info,and Facts -Petckc
Description
The Golden Retriever is a medium-large gun dog that was bred to retrieve shot waterfowl, such as ducks and upland game birds, during hunting and shooting parties. The name “retriever” refers to the breed’s ability to retrieve shot game undamaged due to their soft mouth.
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